Executive Officers

Margaret Crawford, President, is Professor of Architecture at the College of Environmental Design at the University of California at Berkeley. She teaches courses in the history and theory of urban development, planning, and design. Her research focuses on the evolution, uses and meanings of urban space. Her book, Building the Workingman’s Paradise: The Design of American Company Towns, examines the rise and fall of professionally designed industrial environments. She edited The Car and the City: The Automobile, the Built Environment and Daily Urban Life and Everyday Urbanism, and she has published numerous articles on shopping malls, public space, and other issues in the American built environment. Prior to her current position, Crawford was Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design; Chair of the History, Theory, and Humanities program at the Southern California Institute for Architecture; and also taught at the University of Southern California, the University of California at San Diego, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Florence, Italy. She received a BA from the University of California at Berkeley, a Graduate Diploma from the Architectural Association, and a PhD in Urban Planning from UCLA.

D. Bradford Hunt, President-Elect, is Vice President for Research and Academic Programs at the Newberry Library. He was previously Professor of Social Science and History, Dean of the Evelyn T. Stone College of Professional Studies, and Vice Provost for Adult and Experiential Learning at Roosevelt University in Chicago. His history of the Chicago Housing Authority, Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing (University of Chicago Press, 2009), won the 2009 Lewis Mumford Prize from the Society of American City and Regional Planning History for the best book in North American Planning History in 2008-09. He is currently working on a history of post-war planning in Chicago for the American Planning Association, co-authored with Jon B. DeVries. He is the Chair of the Programming Committee of the new National Public Housing Museum (www.nphm.org) and also serves as the Membership Secretary of the Urban History Association. He received his Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2000. He lives in Chicago with his family.

Joseph Heathcott, Past President, teaches at the New School, where he is an Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Associate Dean for Academic Initiatives, School for Public Engagement. He studies the American metropolis and its diverse cultures, institutions, and environments within a comparative and global perspective. Much of his work over the past decade has been to connect the humanities and social sciences with practice fields such as architecture, city planning, advocacy, and urban design. His research on the social and design history of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe public housing project led to an exhibition at MIT titled Vertical City and to a book currently nearing completion with University of Chicago Press. Most recently, his photography exhibit Post-Acropolis Metropolis was installed at the Town Hall Gallery in Stuttgart, Germany. Currently he is developing a volume of essays for Routledge on American Urbanism. During the academic year 2010-2011, Heathcott served as the U.S. Fulbright Distinguished Chair to the United Kingdom at the University of the Arts in London, and as a Senior Visiting Scholar at the London School of Economics.

John McCarthy, Executive Secretary, is Professor of History at Robert Morris University. His areas of interest are 20th Century urban policy, planning history, suburbanization, and race and neighborhood change. John is active in community development in his hometown, the city of Pittsburgh. He received his Ph.D. from Marquette University in 2005. He is the author of Making Milwaukee Mightier: Planning and the Politics of Growth, 1910-1960, (Northern Illinois University Press, 2009), which was awarded the 2009 Gambrinus Prize by the Milwaukee County Historical Society.   John has also served as section editor of Milwaukee Stories: Selections from the Journals of the Milwaukee County Historical Society(Marquette University Press, 2005), and published journal articles on planning history, urban youth culture, and major league baseball.

Walter Greason, Treasurer, is Dean of the Honors School at Monmouth University and Executive Director of the International Center for Metropolitan Growth.  The Center is dedicated to growing new businesses in historically working class neighborhoods and towns throughout North America.  His two books, Suburban Erasure: How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2013), and The Path to Freedom: Black Families in New Jersey (The History Press, 2010), document and analyze hundreds of new primary sources in national and transnational history, emphasizing themes like economic development, race, and urban planning.  Dr. Greason is also a Visiting Professor of History at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey.

Nicholas Dagen Bloom, Ex Officio as JPH Co-Editor, is Associate Professor of Social Science and Chair of Interdisciplinary Studies and Urban Administration at NYIT. He is author/editor of eight books from leading academic presses and serves as a frequent reviewer/guest critic of scholarly manuscripts, student architectural proposals, and published works in urban history. He has also been interviewed and quoted on housing and other topics in leading national and regional media sources including WNYC, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and NPR Marketplace. With other scholars he contributes frequently to Gotham Gazette as an editorial writer on various New York urban affairs topics.

Sonia Hirt, Ex Officio as JPH Co-Editor, is Dean and Professor at the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at the University of Maryland. She was previously Professor in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech, where she also served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. During her sabbatical in 2010-11, Hirt was a Visiting Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Design of Harvard University, where she taught Urbanism in Europe and served as critic at large. Hirt has nearly seventy scholarly and professional publications in the areas of history and theory of urban form, urban design and urban planning. Her emphasis is on culture, institutions and the built environment. Hirt is the author Zoned in the USA: The Origins and Implications of American Land- Use Regulations (Cornell University Press, 2014); Iron Curtains: Gates, Suburbs and Privatization of Space in the Post-socialist City (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012); and Twenty Years of Transition: The Evolution of Urban Planning in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, 1989-2009 (UN-HABITAT, 2009, with K. Stanilov). Iron Curtains received the Honorable Mention for the 2013 Book Prize in Political and Social Studies by Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, awarded by the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies. Zoned in the USA received the Honorable Mention for the 2015 Best Book Prize by the Urban Affairs Association. Hirt is also the editor of The Urban Wisdom of Jane Jacobs (Routledge, 2012 and 2014, with D. Zahm) and the co-editor of the Journal of Planning History (with N. Bloom). Her funding sources include: the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the American Association of University Women.


Board of Directors

Francesca Russello Ammon, Webmaster, is Assistant Professor of City & Regional Planning and Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania.  She recently spent a year as a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, after completing her Ph.D. in American Studies at Yale University.  Ammon also received a B.S.E. in civil engineering from Princeton University and a Master of Environmental Design (M.E.D.) from Yale School of Architecture.  Her areas of major interest include the built environment, urban renewal, photography, and cultural history.  Her book, Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape, was published by Yale University Press last year. Her work has also appeared in the Journal of Planning History, Journal of Urban History, Technology and Culture, and the archive of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS).

Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on understanding how the urban built environment mediates community life and race, class, and social inequality. Her book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University Of Pennsylvania Press: 2013), winner of the 2014 Robert E. Park for best book in urban and community sociology, investigates race and class inequality as negotiated through and codified in the architecture and community gates of public housing and private subdivisions. She received a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Sociology and a Masters in Urban Planning from the University of Michigan, and a B.A. in Sociology from Harvard University.

Robert Freestone is Professor of Planning in the Faculty of Built Environment at UNSW Australia in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He joined UNSW in 1991 after six years with Design Collaborative, a Sydney planning, research and heritage consultancy. He has also held appointments at the University of Melbourne, University of Sydney, and the Australian National University. His books include The Planning Imagination (co-editor, Routledge 2014), Urban Nation (CSIRO Publishing 2012), Designing Australian Cities (UNSW Press 2004), and Urban Planning in a Changing World (Spon 2000). He is chair of the editorial board for Planning Perspectives, and is a former president of the International Planning History Society. He has been a member of SACRPH for over a decade and sits on the editorial advisory board of Journal of Planning History.   

Owen Gutfreund is Associate Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Hunter College, where he also serves as Director of the Graduate program in Urban Affairs. He is the author of Twentieth Century Sprawl: Highways and the Reshaping of the American Landscape (Oxford University Press, 2004) and was one of the authors of Robert Moses and the Modern City (W.W. Norton, 2007). His areas of specialization include planning history, transportation policy, suburbanization, sustainable development, public finance, and comparative urbanization (with an emphasis on cities in developing countries, as well as Canada and Australia). He was an Associate Editor of the Encyclopedia of New York City, and he is on the editorial board of the Journal of Urban History. Owen is currently working on Cities Take Flight, a book about the impact of airports and air travel on American cities and towns. For many years, he was the Director of the Barnard-Columbia Urban Studies Program. He is on the on the board of the Skyscraper Museum, was chair of the Columbia University Seminar on the City, and of the New York Council for the Humanities.

Marta Gutman, historian and licensed architect, teaches architectural and urban history at the Spitzer School of Architecture at the City College of New York and The Graduate Center/CUNY, where she is a member of the doctoral faculty in Art History. Professor Gutman recently published A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950 (University of Chicago Press, 2014), the recipient of the 2015 Kenneth Jackson Award from the Urban History Association. She also edited Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture and Designing Modern Childhoods: History, Space and Material Culture (Rutgers University Press, 2008). Her current book project assesses architecture, education, childhood, and philanthropy during the Civil Rights Movement.

Richard Harris is an urban historical geographer. He is a Professor in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences at McMaster University, where he teaches courses on urban residential, housing, and urban historical geography. He has written about segregation, housing and housing policy, planning, and suburban development in North America and the British colonies. His most-recently published book is Creeping Conformity. How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (Toronto, 2004). With support from a Guggenheim Fellowship, he has recently completed a book, Building a Market: The Rise of the Home Improvement Industry, 1918-1960 (Chicago, 2012). He is currently researching the social geography of Bombay and Calcutta, c.1900, and is part of a 7-year, international project on Global Suburbanisms that is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. For the latter, he is coordinating research on the history of housing and land markets in North America, India, and South Africa over the past century. In 2010, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Carola Hein is Professor and Head, Chair History of Architecture and Urban Planning at Delft University of Technology. She has published widely on topics in contemporary and historical architectural and urban planning – notably in Europe and Japan. Among other major grants, she received a Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue research on The Global Architecture of Oil and an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship to investigate large-scale urban transformation in Hamburg in international context between 1842 and 2008. Her current research interests include transmission of architectural and urban ideas along international networks, focusing specifically on port cities and the global architecture of oil. She is Asia book review editor for the Journal of Urban History and serves as editor for the IPHS section of the journal Planning Perspectives. Her books include: The Capital of Europe (2004), Port Cities: Dynamic Landscapes and Global Networks (2011), Brussels: Perspectives on a European Capital (2007), European Brussels. Whose capital? Whose city? (2006),Rebuilding Urban Japan after 1945 (2003), and Cities, Autonomy and Decentralisation in Japan (2006).

Georgina Hickey is Professor of History at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Amy Howard, Executive Director of the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (http://engage.richmond.edu) at the University of Richmond and associated faculty in American Studies, holds an A.B. with honors in history from Davidson College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in American studies from the College of William and Mary.  The theme of engaged citizenship runs through her work. Howard has taught courses on urban history and American studies and, during the past three years, has taught the “Urban Crisis in America” course as part of a curricular-based living-learning program called the “Civic Engagement House.” Howard’s recent book, More Than Shelter: Activism and Community in San Francisco Public Housing (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) explores the history of tenant activism, community building, and racial and ethnic alliances in San Francisco public housing. Howard and colleague Dr. Thad Williamson are co-authoring a book on politics, leadership, policy, and change in Richmond, Virginia, 1990-2012. She serves on the board of the Better Housing Coalition and is a member of the City of Richmond Planning Commission.

Matthew Gordon Lasner is Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Planning at Hunter College, where he teaches courses on U.S. and global urbanism, housing, and the built environment. His research explores the production of metropolitan American space, with focus on the relationship between the design professions, social change, the market, and the state. His first book, High Life: Condo Living in the Suburban Century (Yale, 2012), was awarded the 2013 Cummings Prize by the Vernacular Architecture Forum. He earned his PhD in architecture and urban planning at Harvard in 2007 and holds an MS in urban and regional planning studies from the London School of Economics and a BA in urban studies from Columbia. Before joining Hunter, Lasner was Assistant Professor of History at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

Robert Lewis is an urban historical geographer who received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 1992. He is a Professor of Geography at the University of Toronto, where he teaches courses on regional and urban geographies. He is the North American editor of Urban History. He has two main research interests. The first is the industrial history of Canadian and American metropolitan areas between 1860 and 1960, with a focus on factory organization and suburbanization. The second is the social geography of colonial Bombay and Calcutta between 1881 and 1921, with an emphasis on the socio-geographical impact of religious, communal and class relations. Along with more than 30 journal publications and book chapters, he has written Chicago Made: Factory Networks in the Industrial Metropolis, 1865-1940 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008) and Manufacturing Montreal: The Making of an Industrial Landscape, 1850-1930 (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2000). He recently completed a book manuscript that examines the calculative strategies of the military-industrial-state complex in Chicago during World War II.

Nick Lombardo is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto. His research deals broadly with the interplay between mobility, nature, infrastructure, and the urban. His dissertation project is about the modernization of the Port of New York from 1865 to 1929. This research aims to understand the production of urban infrastructure space in relationship to mobility and the natural world under the aegis of American Imperialism and industrial capitalism. His past research examined the role of mobility, empire, and planning in the regulation of Muslim pilgrims in Colonial Bombay.

Elizabeth Macdonald, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Urban Design in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture/Environmental Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on the history of urban form, street design, and the post-occupancy assessment of streets and neighborhoods shaped by planning and urban design policy. She consults internationally on street design and planning projects and has designed multiway boulevards in San Francisco, Vancouver, British Columbia, and Ahmedabad, India. She is author of Pleasure Drives and Promenades: A History of Frederick Law Olmsted’s Brooklyn Parkways (Center for American Places, 2012) co-author of The Boulevard Book: History, Evolution, Design of Multiway Boulevards (MIT Press, 2002) and co-editor of The Urban Design Reader (Routledge, 1st edition 2007, 2nd edition 2013).

Timothy Mennel is senior editor at the University of Chicago Press, where he acquires primarily in American history and regional studies. He is responsible for the Historical Studies of Urban America series and the Chicago Visions and Revisions series, among others. Previously, he was senior editor at the American Planning Association, and he has held editorial positions at Random House, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Artforum, and Princeton University Press. He has been a consultant to the Queens Museum of Art, the Museum of the City of New York, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Municipal Art Society of New York, among others. He coedited Reconsidering Jane Jacobs (2011) and Green Community (2009), and he has published a number of journal articles. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in geography from the University of Minnesota and a B.A. in English from Carleton College.

Suleiman Osman is Associate Professor of American Studies at George Washington University. He specializes in 20th century US history, urban history, the built environment and the study of race and ethnicity. His first book, The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York (Oxford University Press, 2011) was awarded the Hornblower Prize by the New York Society Library. He received his PhD in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University.

Elihu Rubin is Associate Professor of Architecture, Urbanism, and American Studies at Yale University.

Rachel Weber is is an Associate Professor in the Urban Planning and Policy Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she teaches courses and conducts research in the fields of economic development, real estate, planning history, and public finance. Much of her recent work has focused on infrastructure privatization and the design and effectiveness of property-tax based incentives for urban development; publications on these topics have appeared in Economic Geography, The Journal of the American Planning Association, and Regional Science and Urban Economics. She is the co-editor of the Oxford University Press Handbook of Urban Planning (Oxford 2012), author of Swords into Dow Shares: Governing the Decline of the Military Industrial Complex (Westview 2001), and author of the forthcoming book Why We Overbuild (under contract, University of Chicago Press). She was appointed by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Reform Task Force in 2011 to provide recommendations to his administration on economic development issues and was a member of the Urban Policy Advisory Committee for then-presidential candidate Barack Obama. She received her undergraduate degree from Brown University and her master’s degree and doctorate in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University.

 

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